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Ambiguous Origins

The spelling with an Jend- is derived from the Polish Jed-, the e having a tail, or as some people put it a comma coming out of the bottom of the letter. This is what it looks like:



If you cannot see what that looks like in the text of this page on your computer, change the view/encoding setting on your browser to central European, Polish or Baltic to see the letters correctly. Web TV viewers might not be able to see this. That special e is pronounced en as in the word end. The root of this syllable comes from the diminutive of the name Andrzej (Andrew): Jedrzej, also meaning Andrew. The -ewski commonly means "son of -" or "from the town of Jedrzejewo". There is no telling which of the two meanings can be derived from this particular name. A name based on one of the apostles, of course, is bound to be common in a Catholic country and is. There are also many towns and villages in Poland that are based on the name Andrew. None of these facts are helpful clues as to the origins of the family as such. In any case it is pronouncedYen' zhe YEF skee oren zhe YEF skee accounting for some variants in American spelling, which are taken from the correct Polish pronunciation of the name.
Ciechanow
The name appears here in cursive as written in the records of Lopacin in Polish (yellow highlight) and in Russian (pink highlight).

There are many variants of the name. In the Polish records for my family, I have seen the name Andrzejewski used interchangeably, by what appeared to be a visiting priest to the Lopacin parish during the mid-19th century. In the United States, I have found records of my grandfather spelled Jedrzejewski and Andrzejewski before settling to Jendrzejewski. In 1990 there were 14,858 individuals with the name Jedrzejewski found throughout Poland. More recently some family members adopted the name Jend.

The name is connected with two noble clan, the Jastrebiec and Nalecz clans, that is families with this name have been associated with these clans. I have not found confirmation of my particular family line having been connected with these clans, but I have not been able to trace the male line much past the19th century. I did find a person in my line that switched from "rolnik" (farmer) to a renter of land when the Russians "emancipated" the surfs during the late 1860s.
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Copyright: This information is presented only for genealogical purposes and may not be copied in any form without written permission by the author.


How to contact me:

Andrew Jendrzejewski
Ajend2@me.com